Group of girls on teeter-totter

DRDP TIMELINE:
DRDP-focused observation, documentation, and rating

Desired Results Developmental Profile access
(DRDP access) Manual

The DRDP access: Desired Results Developmental Profile access Manual was produced by the Desired Results access Project to support the implementation of the Desired Results Assessment System for the Special Education Division of the California Department of Education. It is available at http://www.draccess.org

© 2007-2014 Desired Results access Project, Napa County Office of Education
Funded by the California Department of Education (CDE), Special Education Division

All rights reserved
Permission is granted to reproduce the document in its entirety for the purpose of professional development.

For information, please contact:
Web site: www.draccess.org
E-mail: info@draccess.org
Phone: (800) 673-9220, (707) 227-5963

This file format does not allow responses to be completed or saved. To use this form, please print the PDF version of the document.




Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

Table of Contents

Introduction
Tools for Completing the DRDP access
Instructions – Completing the Information Page
Instructions – Rating the Measures
Instructions – Finalizing the Assessment
Information Page
Rating Record
Measures

Desired Result 1: Children are personally and socially competent.

Indicator: Self-Concept (SELF)

Measure 1 - Identity of Self
Measure 2 - Recognition of Own Skills and Accomplishments
Measure 3 - Self-Expression

Indicator: Social and Interpersonal Skills (SOC)

Measure 4 - Expressions of Empathy
Measure 5 - Interactions with Adults
Measure 6 - Relationships with Familiar Adults
Measure 7 - Developing Friendships
Measure 8 - Building Cooperative Play with Other Children
Measure 9 - Conflict Negotiation
Measure 10 - Awareness of Diversity

Indicator: Self-Regulation (REG)

Measure 11 - Impulse Control
Measure 12 - Seeking Other’s Help to Regulate Self
Measure 13 - Responsiveness to Other’s Support
Measure 14 - Self-Comforting
Measure 15 - Taking Turns

Indicator: Language (LANG)

Measure 16 - Language Comprehension
Measure 17 - Responsiveness to Language
Measure 18 - Expresses Self Through Language
Measure 19 - Uses Language in Conversation

Desired Result 2: Children are effective learners

Indicator: Learning (LRN)

Measure 20 - Curiosity and Initiative
Measure 21 - Attention Maintenance and Persistence

Indicator: Cognitive Competence (COG)

Measure 22 - Memory
Measure 23 - Cause and Effect
Measure 24 - Engages in Problem-Solving
Measure 25 - Object and Pretend Play

Indicator: Math (MATH)

Measure 26 - Number Sense: Understands Quantity and Counting
Measure 27 - Number Sense: Math Operations
Measure 28 - Number Sense: Comparison and Quantity
Measure 29 - Shapes
Measure 30 - Time
Measure 31 - Classification and Matching
Measure 32 - Measurement
Measure 33 - Patterning

Indicator: Literacy (LIT)

Measure 34 - Interest in Literacy
Measure 35 - Concepts of Print
Measure 36 - Letter and Word Knowledge
Measure 37 - Phonological Awareness
Measure 38 - Emerging Writing
Measure 39 - Comprehension of Text

Desired Result 3: Children show physical and motor competence

Indicator: Motor Skills (MOT)

Measure 40 - Movement
Measure 41 - Balance
Measure 42 - Grasp/Release and Manipulation
Measure 43 - Eye-Hand Coordination

Desired Result 4 Children are safe and healthy

Indicator: Safety and Health (SH)

Measure 44 - Personal Care Routines: Toileting and Hygiene
Measure 45 - Personal Care Routines: Dressing
Measure 46 - Personal Care Routines: Self-Feeding
Measure 47 - Personal Safety
Measure 48 - Understanding Healthy Lifestyle: Eating and Nutrition


Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

Introduction

girl playing

Welcome to the Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Assessment System! The State of California has identified four Desired Results for all young children who receive state-funded early care and education services in California and their families. A Desired Result is a condition of well-being for children and families, each defining a single overall outcome. The Desired Results that have been identified for young children in California who receive services through state-funded programs are:

The DRDP access Assessment System has been developed as a way of measuring the progress of children toward achieving these Desired Results. Here is some useful information about the DRDP access Assessment System:


Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

Tools for Completing the DRDP access

The DRDP access includes a set of four tools:

  1. The "DRDP access Manual" is the full version of the instrument. Each of the 48 Measures are presented with the Descriptors on the left side of the page and examples of each Descriptor on the right. It also includes a set of detailed instructions, descriptions of the seven adaptations, a demographic Information Page, and a Rating Record.
  2. The "DRDP access Rating Record" presents all 48 Measures on one page. After each Measure name, a space is provided for you to enter the number that corresponds to the highest level the child has mastered for that Measure.
  3. The "User's Guide to the DRDP access Assessment System for Preschool Special Education" contains essential information on how to use the DRDP access instrument to observe, assess, and report on the development of children birth to five who receive special education services from LEAs.
  4. The "DRDP access Rating Booklet" is an optional tool containing all the Measures, without the examples. The Rating Booklet can serve as a place to record anecdotal notes for an individual child, or as the basis for a child's portfolio.

    The Spanish version of the Rating Booklet can help assessors talk with families who speak Spanish about the DRDP access assessment. Families will be better able to understand how the DRDP access is organized and what skills are measured with it.

Please Note: Regardless of how you record your ratings, you must complete the one-page Rating Record and Information Page. The data from a child's Rating Record and Information Page are entered into the CASEMIS Excel file or an individual SELPA's Management Information System (MIS).


Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

Instructions – Completing the Information Page

Child’s Information

1. Special education enrollment. Check the box that describes the child’s setting at the time of the assessment.

2. Student ID. Write the student identification number issued by the District for reporting to CASEMIS.

3. Statewide Student Identifier. Write the 10-digit state-issued student identification number. Contact your District to obtain this number.

4. First Name (Legal). Write the child’s legal first name.

5. Last Name (Legal). Write the child’s legal last name.

6. Gender. Indicate whether the child is male or female.

7. Birth date. Write the child’s birth date as mm/dd/yyyy (e.g. 08/05/2011).

Child’s Ethnicity/Race Information

8a. Is this child Hispanic or Latino? Specify the child's ethnicity. One of the three choices must be checked.

8b. What is the race of this child? Specify the race of the child. Check up to three. At least one of the choices must be checked.

Child’s Disability Information

9. Primary Disability. Specify the main disability contributing to the child's eligibility for special education and related services. If a child has multiple disabilities and if one of the disabilities is a low-incidence disability (Hard of Hearing, Deafness, Deaf-Blindness, Orthopedic Impairment, or Visual Impairment), the child may be identified using one of the low-incidence disabilities rather than under Multiple Disability.

Child’s Adaptations Information

10. Adaptations. Specify all of the adaptations that were used.

Adaptations Used with the DRDP access
Adaptations are changes in the environment or differences in observed behavior that allow a child with an IEP to be most accurately assessed in their typical settings. The adaptations identified for the DRDP access instrument have been developed so that the assessment will more accurately measure a child's abilities rather than the impact of the disability.

AUGMENTATIVE OR ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM
Methods of communication other than speech that allow a child who is unable to use spoken language to communicate with others.

ALTERNATIVE MODE FOR WRITTEN LANGUAGE
Methods of reading or writing used by a child who cannot see well enough to read or write or cannot hold and manipulate a writing utensil (e.g., pencil, pen) well enough to produce written symbols.

VISUAL SUPPORT
Adjustments to the environment that provide additional information to a child who has limited or reduced visual input.

ASSISTIVE EQUIPMENT OR DEVICE
Tools that make it possible or easier for a child to perform a task.

FUNCTIONAL POSITIONING
Strategic positioning and postural support that allow a child to have increased control of his body.

SENSORY SUPPORT
Increasing or decreasing sensory input to facilitate a child's attention and interaction in the environment.

ALTERNATIVE RESPONSE MODE
Recognition that a child might demonstrate mastery of a skill in a unique way that differs from the child's typically developing peers.

Program Information

11. SELPA. Indicate the SELPA for the child's program. Check with your SELPA office if you do not know your SELPA name.

12. District. Specify the child's school district.

13. Name of person completing the assessment. Specify the name of the primary service provider responsible for the IEP and for completing the DRDP access.

14. Role of person completing the assessment. Check the appropriate box. If not listed, check "Other" and fill in the role.

Program Information

15. Date DRDP access was completed. Indicate the completion date of the assessment in mm/dd/yyyy (e.g., 03/09/2014).

16. Assessment cycle. Check the appropriate box for the assessment period and specify the year.

Key Considerations when Observing Children:

Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

Instructions – Rating the Measures

1. Determine Mastery

For each of the Measures, mark the box on the Rating Record that corresponds to the highest Level the child has mastered. The Levels are arranged from the bottom up, from earlier development to later development. Consider the information from the Descriptors and Examples to determine which Level is most consistent with your observations and other documentation of the child's typical behavior.

A Level is mastered if the child typically demonstrates the behavior:

If you observe skills that seem to be across two or more levels, or if a child demonstrates inconsistent behavior, choose the level that the child demonstrates most typically and solidly.

Not Yet: "Not Yet" allows you to indicate that the child has not yet mastered the behaviors described for the first Level. The "Not yet" option appears on seven Measures of the DRDP access. Most of the Measures on the DRDP access capture children's development beginning at birth or in early infancy. However, because of the nature of what is being observed, some Measures describe behaviors that begin later in development. These Measures have a rating option of "Not Yet" to indicate that the child has not yet mastered the behaviors described for the first Level. If you determine that the child has not yet mastered the first Level, select the "Not Yet" rating and mark a "0" on the Rating Record.

Unable to Rate: In the rare circumstance that you are unable to rate a measure, check the "Unable to Rate" box on the Rating Record and circle the reason why you were unable to rate the Measure (absence or other).

If you were unable to rate the Measure because you don't have enough information, you should make additional observations.

2. Emerging

If your observations indicate that the child has mastered a Level and is also demonstrating behaviors described for the next Level (although not yet easily or consistently across settings), the child may be Emerging to the next Level.

You must mark the level of mastery before indicating that the child is emerging to the next Level. Then, mark the box labeled "EM" if the child is emerging.

If the child is rated at the highest Level in the Measure or "Not Yet", the child cannot also be rated as Emerging.

Note: Indicating that the child is emerging to the next Level within a Measure does not affect the rating.

Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

Instructions – Finalizing the Assessment

1. Make sure that the Information Page is complete and that all Measures have been rated.

2. Transfer the numerical ratings to the DRDP access Rating Record.


Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

DRDP access Information Page

Note: An Information Page plus a Rating Record must be completed for all preschool children with IEPs.

Child's Information

1. Special education enrollment. Check one.
Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)
Individualized Education Program (IEP)




6. Gender

Child's Ethnicity/Race Information

8a. Is this child Hispanic or Latino? Check one.


8b. What is the race of this child? Check up to three.


















Child's Disability Information

9. Primary Disability. Select one.












Child's Adaptations Information

10. Adaptations. Check all that apply.





Program Information



Name of person completing the assessment
14. Role of person completing the assessment.







Assessment Information





Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

DRDP access Rating Record

Note: The Rating Record is not meant to be used independent of the DRDP access Manual or Booklet. You will need to refer to the DRDP access Manual or Booklet to complete this Rating Record. A Rating Record plus an Information Page must be completed for all preschool children with IEPs.

Instructions: Write the child’s name, student identification number (issued by the district for reporting to CASEMIS), and the date this Rating Record was completed. Record the numerical rating for each Measure – the number that corresponds to the Descriptor for the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Check Emerging if the child is “emerging” to the next level. Note that this is optional.

In the rare circumstance that you are unable to rate a particular Measure, check Unable to Rate and select the reason why you are unable to rate this Measure (absence or other).


Measure
Description
Rating
Emerging
Unable to Rate
Reason
1. SELF1
Identity of Self
absence or other
2. SELF2
Recognition of Own Skills and Accomplishments
absence or other
3. SELF3
Self-Expression
absence or other
4. SOC1
Expressions of Empathy
absence or other
5. SOC2
Interactions with Adults
absence or other
6. SOC3
Relationships with Familiar Adults
absence or other
7. SOC4
Developing Friendships
absence or other
8. SOC5
Building Cooperative Play with Other Children
absence or other
9. SOC6
Conflict Negotiation
absence or other
10. SOC7
Awareness of Diversity
absence or other
11. REG1
Impulse Control
absence or other
12. REG2
Seeking Other’s Help to Regulate Self
absence or other
13. REG3
Responsiveness to Other’s Support
absence or other
14. REG4
Self-Comforting
absence or other
15. REG5
Taking Turns
absence or other
16. LANG1
Language Comprehension
absence or other
17. LANG2
Responsiveness to Language
absence or other
18. LANG3
Expresses Self Through Language
absence or other
19. LANG4
Uses Language in Conversation
absence or other
20. LRN1
Curiosity and Initiative
absence or other
21. LRN2
Attention Maintenance and Persistence
absence or other
22. COG1
Memory
absence or other
23. COG2
Cause and Effect
absence or other
24. COG3
Engages in Problem-Solving
absence or other
25. COG4
Object and Pretend Play
absence or other
26. MATH1
Number Sense:
Understands Quantity and Counting
absence or other
27. MATH2
Number Sense: Math Operations
absence or other
28. MATH3
Number Sense:
Comparison of Quantity
absence or other
29. MATH4
Shapes
absence or other
30. MATH5
Time
absence or other
31. MATH6
Classification and Matching
absence or other
32. MATH7
Measurement
absence or other
33. MATH8
Patterning
absence or other
34. LIT1
Interest in Literacy
absence or other
35. LIT2
Concepts of Print
absence or other
36. LIT3
Letter and Word Knowledge
absence or other
37. LIT4
Phonological Awareness
absence or other
38. LIT5
Emerging Writing
absence or other
39. LIT6
Comprehension of Text
absence or other
40. MOT1
Movement
absence or other
41. MOT2
Balance
absence or other
42. MOT3
Grasp/Release and Manipulation
absence or other
43. MOT4
Eye-Hand Coordination
absence or other
44. SH1
Personal Care Routines:
Toileting and Hygiene
absence or other
45. SH2
Personal Care Routines: Dressing
absence or other
46. SH3
Personal Care Routines: Self-Feeding
absence or other
47. SH4
Personal Safety
absence or other
48. SH5
Understanding Healthy Lifestyle:
Eating and Nutrition
absence or other

Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual

DRDP access Measures

There are four Desired Results, 10 Indicators, and 48 on the DRDP access.

Desired Results 1: Children are personally and socially competent

Indicator: Self-Concept (SELF) — Children show self-awareness and a positive self-concept

Measure 1: (SELF 1 of 3): Identity of Self

Definition: Child shows increasing awareness that self is distinct from and also connected to others

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 1 Level Descriptor Examples
Accurately compares self to others
  • Child indicates that she has brown hair but that Alicia has black hair.
  • Child points to a picture of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich when asked what he likes to eat. Then child points to a picture of cheese when asked what his mommy likes to eat.
  • Noticing a friend’s shoes, says, “We both have sandals on today!”
  • Communicates, “My sister goes to first grade and I go to preschool.”
Describes self or others in terms of preferences
  • “I like red hair.”
  • “I like to jump.”
  • “I like the play dough. It is nice and warm.”
  • Child brings a preferred object to another child.
  • Child signs, “David likes crackers.”
Describes self or others in terms of basic physical characteristics
  • “My hair is red!”
    Child uses a communication device to say, “I’m big!”
  • Says, “I am four,” or shows four fingers to indicate age.
  • “Tami has long hair.”
Expresses ideas about self and his or her connection to other people and things
  • Uses family roles, such as, “Brother,” “Baby sister,” Mommy,” or “Daddy” in pretend play.
  • Scribbles and then communicates that it is a picture of herself.
  • Communicates details about family or social experiences.
  • While playing in the kitchen area, pretends to prepare food the way it is done in own home.
Communicates own name and names of familiar people and things
  • Communicates, “Mama,” “Daddy,” or “Blankie.”
  • Refers to adult by name or special gesture.
  • Points to peer and says his or her name.
  • Points at picture of self and says or signs name.
Recognizes self, familiar people, and familiar things
  • Responds when own name is called.
  • Attends to familiar people or things when named.
  • Maintains contact with familiar person.
  • Holds familiar object, such as blanket, for comfort or security.
  • Recognizes reflection of self in mirror.
  • Hesitates around unfamiliar people.
Uses senses to explore self and others
  • Examines own hand or foot by looking at it or mouthing it.
  • Attends to other people’s faces or voices for long periods of time.
  • Makes eye contact.
  • Touches adult’s hair or face when it is within reach.
Attends to adult
  • Attends to adult during feeding.
  • Quiets to listen to adult during care giving routine.
  • Turns head toward adult during care giving routine.

Top | Self-Concept | Table of Contents | Rating the Measures

Measure 2 (SELF 2 of 3): Recognition of Own Skills and Accomplishments

Definition: Child evaluates and takes pleasure in own ability to perform skillfully

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 2 Level Descriptor Examples
Characterizes self positively in terms of generalized ability or skills
  • Communicates using speech, sign, or communication device:
  • “I can build tall towers.”
  • “I am really good at building things.”
  • “I can help you work on the puzzle.”
  • “I am good at drawing monsters.”
Characterizes self positively in terms of specific skills involved in doing a task
  • Shows another child some ways he knows to make a block tower more stable.
  • After doing a puzzle with other children, says, “First we look for the corner pieces that’s how we do it!”
  • Shows or describes efforts at writing a letter.
Seeks adult’s attention ahead of time in order to demonstrate abilities
  • Tries to get adult to watch by calling, motioning, or pulling before he or she does something, such as slide down the slide.
  • Says, “Watch me! Watch me!” and then demonstrates that he or she can put on own coat.
Characterizes self positively in terms of specific activity that he or she is doing
  • “I’m making a really big tower.”
  • “Look what I made!”
  • “I cleaned up with a sponge!”
  • Communicates “We DID it!” after finishing a puzzle with a friend.
  • Point or gestures with delight at the completed class mural.
  • Shows/gives a “thumbs-up” or claps after finishing a painting.
Shows interest and/or pleasure when someone reacts to own activity or accomplishment
  • When adult tells the child that she did a good job washing her hands, the child smiles with joy.
  • Joins adult in clapping with pleasure, after completing a challenging task.
Persists in trying to do things even if faced with difficulty
  • Tries to roll or creep to another part of room even when there is a barrier.
  • Keeps trying to reach for object that is just out of reach.
  • Keeps trying to get adult’s attention when adult is busy.
Shows pleasure while repeating simple actions
  • Smiles while kicking.
  • Makes sounds while waving arms at something.
Continues simple behavior until needs are met
  • Cries when hungry until fed.
  • Cries until adult succeeds in comforting child.

Top | Self-Concept | Table of Contents | Rating the Measures

Measure 3 (SELF 3 of 3): Self-Expression

Definition: Child explores own action, makes presence known in social situations, and outwardly expresses feelings to others

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 3 Level Descriptor Examples
Begins to understand that he/she can feel more than one way about something (“mixed or opposite feelings”)

Communicates:

  • That he is excited about going to the petting zoo but anxious about petting the goat.
  • Feeling happy about trying out a climbing structure but scared about being at the top.
Identifies own and other’s feelings; understands that own feelings might be different than someone else’s

Communicates using speech, sign, or communication device:

  • “Mary is sad today. I am happy today.”
  • “He’s scared, but I’m not scared.”
Expresses ways to take care of feelings
  • “I want to go home.”
  • Communicates, “I’m scared,” and goes to adult for a hug.
  • Stays by the door because he/she is missing mommy.
Labels own feelings
  • Communicates, “I am sad” or “I am mad.”
  • Points to a happy face to describe that he or she is happy.
Asserts self by expressing needs, feelings, or desires through simple actions
  • Holds onto toy when someone tries to take it.
  • Turns body away from somebody when needing a break.
  • Watches for awhile before joining in play with another child.
  • Lies down when tired.
  • Pushes things away when finished.
Expresses self by repeating actions that have an effect
  • Drops object repeatedly for adult to pick up.
  • Presses button on push-button toy that makes noise.
  • Signals to get adult to repeat an action.
Responds to people or things in the environment through actions or sounds
  • Reaches for a toy.
  • Grasps things or people.
  • Smiles or stares at people or things.
  • Orients to a sound.
  • Pushes away something the adult offers.
Moves or vocalizes
  • Cries.
  • Moves arms, head, legs, or other parts of the body.
  • Makes sounds.

Top | Self-Concept | Table of Contents | Rating the Measures

Indicator: SOC—Children demonstrate effective social and interpersonal skills

Measure 4 (SOC 1 of 7): Expressions of Empathy

Definition: Child shows awareness of other’s feelings and responds to expressions of feelings by others in ways that are increasingly appropriate to the other person’s needs

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 4 Level Descriptor Examples
Shows concern for the future welfare of others
  • Shows concern for what will happen to animals and characters in a story or movie.
Uses words or actions to demonstrate concern for what others are feeling
  • Asks child, “Why are you crying?” When told he misses his mommy, says, “Don’t worry, your mommy will be back soon.”
  • Puts arm around a child who is standing alone or signs, “Want to play with me?”
  • Goes to a child whose tower fell down and helps to build the tower again.
  • Brings a marker to a child who is looking for something to draw with.
Accurately labels own feelings, as well as those of others
  • Draws picture representing child who is upset and makes a sad face herself.
  • “Maria is laughing-she is happy today.”
  • Points out picture in book of someone who looks “mad.”
Offers to comfort someone showing distress
  • Goes to and hugs child who is sad.
  • Offers special toy or object to child or adult who is showing distress.
  • Calls or gets adult to help a child who is showing distress.
Shows concern when others are unhappy or upset
  • Looks worried and waits to see if adult will come to help a child who is upset.
  • Points to band-aid on someone’s elbow and says “ouch” or “booboo.”
  • Moves next to a child who is showing distress.
Responds based on others’ expressions of
emotions
  • Laughs when adult giggles.
  • Stops playing or watches another child intently if that child is hurt or sad.
  • Shows a fearful face if another child is sad or hurt.
  • Claps hands when another child or adult claps hands.
  • Looks at another child who is upset, but doesn’t stop playing.
Shows awareness of others
  • Cries when other children cry.
  • Notices people.
  • Smiles at other people.

Top | Social and Interpersonal Skills | Table of Contents | Rating the Measures

Measure 5 (SOC 2 of 7) Interactions with Adults

Definition: Child interacts effectively with both familiar and somewhat familiar adults

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 5 Level Descriptor Examples
Interacts with adult to solve problems, make plans, or communicate about past experiences or new ideas
  • Talks with adult about a family event that’s going to happen.
  • During pretend play in kitchen area, comes over acting like a waiter. Adult tells child that she would like a hamburger. In response, child brings over a hamburger and then asks, “Wanna drink?”
Interacts with adult in a coordinated way by playing simple games, playing with objects, or fully participating in routines
  • Communicates about book with adult.
  • Participates in diaper change by doing several steps, like pulling tab on diaper, lifting bottom, pulling a wipe from box, and holding clean diaper.
  • Laughs and touches adult’s hands in a game of “Peek-A-Boo.”
Tries to participate with adult in parts of simple familiar games, songs, finger plays, or routines by doing one or two actions
  • Lifts bottom during diaper change.
  • Makes sounds or motions to adult to play simple game, sing song, or do finger play.
  • Imitates adult’s clap or wave.
  • Sits on adult’s lap and looks at photo.
  • Does hand motions for “roll it” segment of Pat-A-Cake.
Responds and pays attention to adult, and gives cues to adult to interact
  • Babbles or vocalizes in response to adult’s behavior.
  • Coos at adult who is not paying attention.
  • Turns head away from adult when over-stimulated.
  • Laughs in response to an adult’s playfulness.
  • Reaches toward toy that adult holds out.
Reacts to adult’s behavior
  • Stops crying temporarily when adult comes near.
  • Turns toward sound or movement made by adult.
  • Grasps adult’s finger when in palm.

Top | Social and Interpersonal Skills | Table of Contents | Rating the Measures

Measure 6 (SOC 3 of 7): Relationships with Familiar Adults

Definition: Child forms close relationships or attachments with familiar adults

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 6 Level Descriptor Examples
Works cooperatively with adult to plan and organize activities and to solve problems
  • “I can help set the table for snack.”
  • Cooperates and plans with adult to find a way to bring water to the sandbox.
  • Interacts with adult to solve a problem he’s having with a puzzle.
  • Plans an art activity with adult.
Relates regularly to familiar adult to share ideas, experiences, feelings, and plans
  • Asks, “Can we play with play dough?”
  • Calls familiar adult over while doing an activity.
  • Communicates with familiar adult about feeling sad.
  • Uses gestures to show adult how he or she was hurt when playing.
  • Asks, “Guess what I saw yesterday?”
  • Asks adult why other child is not going outside.
  • Pulls adult to site where he/she found a bug.
Seeks familiar adult to get needs met
  • Communicates, “Teacher I need help.”
  • Asks adult sitting next to her to tie her shoes.
  • Asks adult to get something he or she cannot reach.
  • Seeks out familiar adult to play trucks or a game.
Seeks to maintain contact with familiar adult through eye contact, vocalizations, or physically
  • Places a toy on familiar adult’s lap, goes to get another toy and then places that toy on familiar adult’s lap.
  • When not sure if something is safe, looks at or goes to familiar adult.
  • Makes eye contact with familiar adult from time to time.
  • Vocalizes to familiar adult on other side of room.
Shows anxiety over separation from familiar adults

At drop off time:

  • Momentarily cries or clings to parent.
  • Crawls or walks to the door and stays there.
  • Becomes very quiet and hesitant to join other activities.
Responds to actions or facial expressions of familiar adult
  • Imitates familiar adult’s smile.
  • Keeps track of familiar adult’s movement around the room.
  • Shows preference for being held by a familiar adult.
Attends to familiar adult’s face and voice
  • Turns head toward familiar adult.
  • Looks in direction of familiar adult’s voice.

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Measure 7 (SOC 4 of 7): Developing Friendships

Child forms close relationships with specific peers, sharing experiences and activities

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 7 Level Descriptor Examples
Engages in on-going social games and pretend play with a particular child
  • Over many days, builds a pretend city using blocks with Jose.
  • Spends free time across a period of days with a particular child or children, pretending to be members of a family.
Prefers being with a particular child who also expresses preference for him or her
  • Asks Jose, “Do you want to play with blocks or puppets?” and plays the activity Jose chooses.
  • Refers to activities he and a preferred playmate have enjoyed doing together.
  • “Emma and I like to play together,” and Emma nods her head.
Identifies another child as a friend
  • Communicates, “Jose is my friend.”
  • Communicates, “I want to play with Donna. She’s my friend.”
  • Chooses the same child as a partner for group walks.
  • Identifies a friend using augmentative communication device.
Plays with one or two children in group on a regular basis
  • Plays with same friend(s) day after day.
  • Looks for favorite child when entering the room in the morning.
  • Selects a picture of playmate.
Shows interest in other children at play
  • Reaches for a toy or object being used by another child.
  • Watches other children as they play.
  • Moves closer to one or two “friends” while they play.
Responds to other children and explores their faces and bodies
  • Moves excitedly when another child comes near.
  • Pats or grasps another child.
  • Rolls toward another child.
  • Cries if another child gets too close.
Attends to other children’s behavior
  • Looks at or turns toward other children.

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Measure 8 (SOC 5 of 7): Building Cooperative Play with Other Children

Definition: Child interacts with other children through play that becomes increasingly cooperative and towards a shared purpose

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 8 Level Descriptor Examples
Participates in games with rules
  • Plays “Candy Land.”
  • Participates in “Duck, Duck, Goose.”
Leads or participates in planning cooperative play with other children
  • Participates in pretend play with peers, following the agreed upon roles.
  • Builds a city of blocks with other children.
  • Successfully helps to negotiate where and how a small group of children can play.
  • “We can make a big spaceship with the LEGOS. Want to try?”
Engages with another child or children in play involving a common idea or purpose
  • Takes turns putting on hats with another child.
  • Pretends to eat food after a child serves it to him or her.
  • Joins in with other children to make a mountain of sand.
  • Builds a block tower with another child.
Interacts with other children side-by-side as they play with similar materials
  • Plays blocks side-by-side with other children.
  • Hands another child a toy that he or she is looking for.
  • Hands a bucket to child sitting next to him or her in sandbox.
Plays near other children with similar materials, but usually does not interact with them
  • Plays by self with trucks when other children nearby are playing with trucks.
  • Plays by self in sandbox near other children.
Responds to other children or their behavior
  • Moves excitedly when another child comes near.
  • Pats or grasps another child.
  • Rolls toward another child.
  • Cries if another child gets too close.
  • Cries when other children cry.
  • Looks or turns toward other children.
Attends to other children
  • Notices other children.

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Measure 9 (SOC 6 of 7 ): Conflict Negotiation

Definition: Child learns how to understand the needs of other children and to negotiate constructively within the constraints of social rules and values

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 9 Level Descriptor Examples
Suggests simple solutions based on classroom rules
  • When a conflict arises about the slide, suggests, “Only one person on the slide at a time.”
  • When adult assigns jobs, reminds others that Tommy is the line leader.
Expresses own needs and desires about a conflict and suggests simple solutions based mainly on own needs
  • “I need a turn on the trike. Let me use it.”
  • “I want to play on the computer. When will it be my turn?”
  • When he wants to play a game for four children and all the spots are taken, will signal or ask another child if he can take his place.
  • Communicates, “I am playing with that truck. You can play with those cars.”
Starts to use appropriate words and actions to express own desire and, when needed, seeks adult help to resolve a conflict
  • Seeks out adult and indicates that another child won’t give her a turn on the trike.
  • Says or indicates to adult, “He is on my rug.”
  • When child wants to play with trucks and all the trucks are being played with, asks other children if she can have a truck.When this does not work, will go to adult and indicate that she needs a truck.
  • Communicates, “I am playing with that dinosaur. You can’t have it.”
Responds to adult guidance in negotiating conflict
  • Wants another child’s toy, but accepts a different toy that an adult offers.
  • Cries when a child is too close but quiets down when adult suggests a different seating arrangement.
  • Child scoots over at the suggestion of the adult.
Asserts self, using facial expressions, words, or actions in conflict situations, but needs adult to resolve conflict
  • Child expresses that she wants another child’s trike. She needs adult redirection so she does not try to take it.
  • When another child tries to take a toy, he pulls the toy back or protests, needing adult to resolve the conflict.
  • Needs adult to offer a way to join other children playing with puppets without disturbing them.
Not yet

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Measure 10 (SOC 7 of 7) Awareness of Diversity

Definition: Child acknowledges and responds to similarities and differences between self and others, and learns to appreciate the value of each person in diverse communities

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 10 Level Descriptor Examples
Adapts to other’s needs (notion of justice and inclusion)
  • Uses gestures or asks adult to translate to invite a child who speaks another language to play with the group.
  • Moves chair(s) over so that child who uses a wheelchair can come to the table.
Identifies differences and similarities between self and others

Communicates:

  • “We both have ponytails, but mine is longer.”
  • “I’m a girl, and Tony’s a boy.”
  • “You are big, and I am little.”
Notices, asks questions or makes comments about people’s characteristics or behavior
  • Says, “boo-boo?” when noticing someone’s blemish or scar.
  • Says or signs, “What’s that?” to the adult wearing new glasses.
  • Comments on hair color, eye color, or skin tone that is different from his or her own.
  • Shows interest by touching the hair of a child whose hair color or hair texture is different from his or her own.
Explores different ways to put characteristics or actions of others into categories, sometimes incorrectly
  • Calls all children younger than self, “Baby.”
  • Points to character in book and either calls out the name of or points to a child in the room who has the same physical characteristics.
  • Labels someone with gray hair as “Grandma,” “Grandpa,” “Oma,” “Lola,” etc.
  • Says, “Mommy,” when referring to purse.
3 Imitates behaviors or actions of familiar people
  • Pretends to read to baby doll like an adult would.
  • Indicates preference for eating what others are eating.
  • Tries to feed adult.
  • Imitates brushing hair or using purse like adult.
Notices the difference between familiar and unfamiliar
  • Looks longer at adult with new glasses.
  • Notices unfamiliar person who comes into the room.
  • Turns toward person speaking in an unfamiliar language.
  • Looks away from adult wearing a hat.
  • Cries in presence of unfamiliar adult.
Attends to people, events, or objects
  • Orients to voices.
  • Attends to faces.

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Indicator: REG—Children demonstrate effective self-regulation in their behavior

Measure 11 (REG 1 of 5) Impulse Control

Definition: Child develops strategies for regulating responses in increasingly socially appropriate ways

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 11 Level Descriptor Examples
Is increasingly able to use a variety of strategies to regulate own behavior and get needs or wants met in socially appropriate ways
  • When child is not able to use the computer, engages in another activity of interest until it is available.
  • “I told Aurelio he can use the scooter in five minutes.”
  • When the playhouse is full, says to an adult, “Can you call me when I can play in the playhouse?” then goes to the water table.
Uses simple routines, follows rules, or takes action ahead of time to cope with not being able to get needs or wants met immediately
  • Begins to wash hands when noticing preparations for lunch or snack.
  • States, “No hitting,” instead of hitting other child.
  • Talks to a friend in line while waiting for turn.
  • Asks for adult to read book, then looks at book while waiting for adult to come.
Can follow simple social rules and routines to refrain from acting impulsively but sometimes needs adult guidance and support
  • Can wait for food to be passed at lunchtime, but may need adult reminder.
  • Needs to be reminded to stop playing and clean up after playtime is over.
Accepts active adult guidance and support to stop self from acting impulsively on desires or needs
  • When adult says she has to wait to use the easel, accepts another activity.
  • When it is time to move from one activity to another, accepts adult guidance to do so.
Can cope for a short period of time when needs or wants are not met immediately
  • Waits for adult to come give help without crying.
  • Waits for other child to stop playing with toy before grabbing it.
Takes immediate action to get needs or wants met without considering impact on others or self
  • Reaches for and grabs food on other child or adult’s plate.
  • Resists sleep if interested in present activity.
  • Attempts to crawl over another child to get object of interest.
  • Takes toy from another child.
Responds to a specific kind of internal or external stimulation using a variety of behaviors
  • Cries for bottle until adult brings it to him or her.
  • Pushes unwanted items away.
  • Turns head away when full.
  • Comforts self with blanket or toy.
Reacts to internal and external stimulation with simple behaviors
  • Sleeps when sleepy.
  • Cries when distressed or uncomfortable.
  • Smiles in response to familiar faces.

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Measure 12 (REG 2 of 5) Seeking Other’s Help to Regulate Self

Definition: Child seeks assistance from other people to manage needs

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 12 Level Descriptor Examples
Requests adult’s help ahead of time in order to get needs met
  • Requests special stuffed toy or blanket before naptime.
  • Asks adult for props, such as a bottle for a baby doll, to prepare for pretend play.
  • Asks or motions to adult to undo snap on pants so he can use the potty.
Communicates specific physical or emotional needs to adult
  • Brings shoe to adult when needing help to put it on.
  • Points at cup or uses the sign for “more” to get more milk.
  • Use augmentative communication device or picture board to request assistance from an adult.
Goes or signals to adult when needing comfort or help
  • Looks at adult often while playing.
  • Vocalizes to or moves toward adult when something unusual happens, such as a loud noise.
  • Moves toward or gestures to familiar adult when tired.
Gives simple cues to adult about physical and emotional needs
  • Smiles and coos when adult gives attention.
  • Fusses to get needs met.
Reacts to internal and external sensations
  • Relaxes body when held.
  • Cries when tired or hungry.

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Measure 13 (REG 3 of 5) Responsiveness to Other’s Support

Definition: Child is responsive to other’s assistance with self-regulation

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 13 Level Descriptor Examples
Uses adult’s past guidance to regulate own emotions and behavior in the present
  • Stops tussling with other child over a toy, and offers that child a similar toy.
  • Reassures self after seeing another child picked up by parent by saying to adult, “My mommy’s coming.”
  • Says to self, “Be careful,” when climbing a play structure.
  • Takes puzzle to quiet area when distracted by loud play or other children.
Follows adult’s guidance to regulate own emotions and behavior
  • Stops tussling with other child over object when adult says, “You want to play with the truck that Jimmy has, but here are other trucks you can use.”
  • Waits to go down slide when adult says, “Wait until Susie is all the way down.”
  • Goes over to cozy corner to rest when adult says, “You look sleepy. Would you like to lie down?”
Regulates self when adult establishes visual or verbal contact, moves close, or offers special comforting object
  • Stops fussing when frustrated after adult moves close to offer supportive presence.
  • Hesitates while climbing and stops to look at adult. Then resumes climbing when adult reassuringly says, “You’re high up.”
  • Gets up after falling down, and resumes play when adult gives reassuring look or word.
  • Accepts blanket or special toy when adult brings it to him for comfort.
  • Screams when another child takes toy, and then stops when adult says, “I’m coming.”
Attends to adult when comforted
  • Quiets, and responds to adult’s touch or voice when being comforted.
  • Orients toward adult when being comforted.
Settles down when comforted by adult
  • Stops crying when picked up by adult.
  • Stops fussing and starts to suck on bottle or nipple when adult places it close to her or his mouth.
  • Relaxes and snuggles up to adult’s body when being held.
  • Quiets when adult sings a lullaby.

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Measure 14 (REG 4 of 5) Self-Comforting

Definition: Child comforts self in response to distress from either internal or external stimulation

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 14 Level Descriptor Examples
Anticipates need for comfort and prepares self for changes in routine
  • Prepares self for transitions by asking what’s going to happen.
  • When dropped off by parent, takes parent over to quiet place to read a book together before parent leaves.
Chooses to comfort self in one or more ways that fit with the situation
  • Asks for music or lullaby when lying down for nap.
  • When upset after parent leaves, goes to get photo of parent and shows it to adult.
  • Goes to cozy area to get away from active play of other children.
Comforts self by seeking either a familiar person or a special object
  • Soothes self with familiar object, such as a blanket, when tired or upset.
  • Gestures to adult to pick him or her up when sleepy.
Uses simple responses to comfort self
  • Sucks thumb to soothe self.
  • Turns head away from sensory experiences that are overwhelming.
  • Nuzzles face into blanket or adult’s sweater.
Responds reflexively to aversive stimulation or distress
  • Startles when she hears a loud noise.
  • Closes eyes when exposed to bright sunlight.
  • Cries when tired, hungry, or uncomfortable.

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Measure 15 (REG 5 of 5) Taking Turns

Definition: Child develops increased understanding of taking turns and begins to propose strategies for taking turns

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 15 Level Descriptor Examples
Routinely proposes turn-taking as a solution to conflicts about use of materials and equipment
  • Uses verbal, sign or augmentative communication to suggest: “He paints first, then me, then you.”
  • Reminds other child to take a ticket and wait for his turn on the trike.
  • “Justin can wash his hands first, then Carlos, then me.”
Demonstrates knowledge of turn-taking rules and procedures and abides by them most of the time
  • “We can each get a turn to paint.”
  • Communicates, “I wash my hands after Justin,” then waits for her turn.
  • Accepts the rule when another child says, “The rule is—We each get five minutes.”
Uses adult-structured turn-taking procedures (including rules and/or cues)
  • Accepts that her turn on the easel is over when she finishes one picture.
  • Takes ticket or puts name in a pouch or on a list to take a turn.
  • Accepts a timer or hourglass to determine start and end of a turn.
Follows adult’s request to wait for turn
  • When all the easels are being used, follows adult’s request to work at the art table until an easel is available.
  • Goes with a group of children to wash hands; waits for turn when asked by an adult.
Needs adult’s direction and support to wait for turn or to give another child a turn
  • Waits for his turn to stir cookie dough when adult is directing activity.
  • Allows another child to pet the Guinea pig adult is holding when told, “Now it’s Sam’s turn.”
Not yet

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Indicator: LANG—Children show growing abilities in communication and language

Measure 16 (LANG 1 of 4) Language Comprehension

Definition: Child receives, understands, and responds to oral language that uses increasingly complex words, phrases, and ideas

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 16 Level Descriptor Examples
Comprehends language that describes past or future events and language that describes how and why things happen
  • Responds to open-ended questions requiring prediction or explanation such as, “What will happen if…?” and “Why is the…?”
  • Can participate in discussions about future events such as an upcoming trip to the zoo.
Comprehends language that describes abstract concepts such as location or comparison
  • Understands words used to describe spatial relationships such as in/out, over/under, behind/in front of.
  • Understands words that compare such as, “Who made the tallest tower?” or “My car is faster than your car.”
Comprehends simple pronouns and possessives used to refer to things in the environment
  • Responds correctly to directions to “Give him the marker” or “Give her the marker.”
  • Responds to the request to “Put this in Josh’s cubby.”
Comprehends the meaning of simple sentences
  • Responds to sentences and longer utterances in ways that demonstrate comprehension.
  • Goes to look outside when teacher says, “Bobby went to play outside.”
  • Pretends to feed the baby doll when the teacher says, “Oh, the baby is hungry.”
Comprehends an increasing number of words including words used to refer to things that are not present
  • Points to familiar objects when named.
  • Goes and finds named object if it is not in view.
Recognizes words that are used frequently in routines to name things or actions
  • Points to body parts (nose, eyes, mouth), when adult names them.
  • Performs a routine action when it is suggested (“Wanna dance?” or “Wanna drink?”).
Recognizes a few familiar words that the adult says or a few familiar gestures the adult makes in context
  • Orients toward or searches for a familiar person (“mama” or “daddy) or object (ball or doggie) when named.
  • Stops crying for bottle when adult says, “Bottle’s ready.”
  • Smiles or shows excitement when adult starts to put hands over eyes to play Peek-a-Boo or initiates another game.
Responds to familiar adult’s voice or gestures
  • Smiles, gurgles, or coos in response to familiar adult’s voice.
  • Vocalizes or moves in response to familiar adult’s voice, sounds or simple gestures.
  • Smiles back when adult smiles.
Reacts to voices, sounds or gestures
  • Reacts by quieting or orienting in direction of sound or gesture.
  • Startles at loud noise.

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Measure 17 (LANG 2 of 4) Responsiveness to Language

Definition: Child understands and responds to increasingly complex directions and requests

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 17 Level Descriptor Examples
Carries out a request that has three related steps that are about a new and unfamiliar situation
  • Can follow instructions when adult says, “Fold your paper in half, then open it up and put paint in the middle.” or “Today, get your paints and paper from the shelf, take them outside to the table and paint your picture outside.”
Carries out three-step instructions that are part of a familiar routine
  • Can follow instructions when adult says, “Finish your painting, wash out the brush and then hang up your smock.” or “Push your chair in, put your book in the cubby and line up to wash your hands.”
Carries out requests, comments, or questions that refer to actions that will happen at a later time
  • Responds appropriately to adult who says, “In a few minutes, it’ll be time to clean up so we can eat lunch.”
  • Responds appropriately when adult says, “Put your blanket in your cubby now.
  • After you’re done eating lunch, you can have it again.” After lunch, gets blanket out of cubby.
Carries out one- and two-step instructions about unfamiliar routines or unrelated events
  • Can follow simple directions in learning a new game (“Tag one of the children in the circle and then run around the circle.”).
  • Responds when teacher says, “Please get me a paper towel and take this paint brush to Sam.”
Carries out instructions about familiar routines
  • Responds correctly when teacher says, “It’s time for snack, please wash your hands.”
Responds to simple requests, comments, or questions that refer to routines or to the present situation
  • Shakes head “yes” or “no” in response to simple questions such as, “Do you want a cookie?”
  • Looks for pet after adult asks, “Where’s the kitty?”
  • Responds when adult says, “Can you find your shoes?”
Responds to a few familiar words or familiar gestures
  • Looks for familiar person (“mama” or “daddy”) when named.
  • Smiles as parents wave.
Responds to familiar adult’s voice or gestures
  • Smiles, gurgles, or coos in response to familiar adult’s voice or touch.
  • Orients toward familiar adult’s voice or gestures.
Reacts to voices, sounds or gestures
  • Reacts by quieting or orienting in direction of sound or gesture.
  • Startles at loud noise.

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Measure 18 (LANG 3 of 4) Expresses Self Through Language

Definition: Child uses language to communicate with increasingly complex words and sentences

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 18 Level Descriptor Examples
Uses more complex language or vocabulary to describe events that are imaginary, to explain, or to predict
  • “If I were a princess, I would have a beautiful dress.”
  • “He can throw the ball farther than you because he has very big muscles.”
  • “When we put the balls in the water, they will float.”
Uses increasingly varied and grammatically complex sentences

Combines phrases and sentences into complex sentences:

  • “We were playing outside and Bobby fell down.”
  • “I tried to open it but it was too hard.”
  • “He can do it because he is bigger.”
Uses simple phrases and sentences, applying simple grammatical rules

Phrases and sentences might include:

  • Negative forms: “Bobby can’t play.”
  • Adjective-noun combinations: “That’s a green hat.”
  • Past tense: “He played outside.”
  • Future tense: “She’s gonna go to the zoo.”
Combines words into phrases or sentences to express needs, feelings, and interests

Combines more than two words or signs to communicate. For example:

  • “Me go outside now.”
  • “Take shoes off.”
  • “I want my mommy.”
  • “No like that.”
Communicates using increasing numbers of two word combinations

Combines two words or signs to communicate. For example:

  • “push truck”
  • “my cookie”
  • “no night-night”
  • “more juice”
  • “that baby”
Uses an increasing number of simple words to communicate
  • Uses single words or signs to name people, objects, or actions.
  • Uses words or signs to communicate things such as “no,” “more,” “all gone,” and “up.”
Has a few word approximations or gestures that communicate
  • Reaches for or gestures to an object that he wants.
  • May say “ma-ma,” “da-da,” or “ba-ba” (bottle) or similar word approximations.
  • May have a few special gestures to communicate needs or name things.
Responds to environment through gestures, sounds, or facial expressions
  • Waves arms or kicks legs excitedly when adult blows bubbles.
  • Cries or fusses when hungry.
Makes sounds spontaneously
  • Coos.
  • Cries.

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Measure 19 (LANG 4 of 4) Uses Language in Conversation

Definition: Child engages in increasingly extended conversations following the appropriate
social use of language

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 19 Level Descriptor Examples
Has extended conversations that include discussions of emotions, ideas, and information obtained from the other person
  • In a conversation, develops a thought or idea using six or more related sentences that have a theme.
Maintains conversations about real or imaginary experiences
  • Maintains a topic of conversation for four or more turns with another in pretend play or when talking about an interesting subject.
Uses language appropriately for a variety of purposes

Uses language to:

  • Ask questions: “Where did the doggie go?”
  • Make requests appropriately: “Can I have more milk?”
  • Refuse or decline: “I don’t want to swing.”
  • Tell a simple joke.
Engages in simple conversations with adult that involve several related ideas
  • Talks with adult about a story that is read.
  • Engages in simple conversation while role playing during pretend play.
Introduces one or two related ideas in back-and-forth communication with adult
  • Shows adult teddy bear and says, “My teddy.” When adult asks, “What is your teddy bear’s name?” Answers, “Pooh Bear.”
  • Nods head “yes” when adult asks if he likes pizza, and then says, “More milk.”
Engages in back-and-forth naming with adult using familiar single words
  • Names familiar pictures in a book or familiar objects when adult asks, “What’s that?”
  • Names peers or familiar adults when adult asks, “Who’s that?”
Engages in back-and-forth communication with adult using vocalizations, gestures, or facial expressions
  • Makes sounds in response to adult talking and then waits for adult to respond. or
  • Moves in response to adult’s gestures and then waits for adult to respond.
  • Engages in turn-taking games with adult such as Peek-a-Boo.
Responds to adult’s voice or facial expressions during interaction
  • Smiles back when adult smiles.
  • Quiets or stops movements when adult begins talking or making facial or gestural movements; makes sounds or moves when adult stops.
Reacts to sounds or gestures
  • Looks or orients in direction of voices or gestures.
  • Coos or gurgles in response to sound.

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Desired Results 2: Children are effective learners

Indicator: Learning (LRN)—Children show interest, motivation, and persistence in their approaches to learning

Measure 20 (LRN 1 of 2) Curiosity and Initiative

Definition: Child pursues knowledge or understanding of new materials or activities

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 20 Level Descriptor Examples
Carries out a plan to test a hypothesis, thought, or idea
  • Child wants to know if the class hamster likes to eat apples so tries to feed the hamster some apple slices.
  • While filling the sandbox with water to watch things float, says “Look what happens when I do this.”
  • Digs trenches in the sand to watch water flow through.
Uses a variety of strategies to obtain additional information related to activities of interest
  • After a trip to a fire station, asks adult about things she saw and looks at a book about fire trucks.
  • After a nature walk, child asks for books about bugs or looks at a bug specimen with a magnifying glass.
Puts materials or objects together in new ways to learn what will result or to create something
  • Combines bristle blocks and LEGOTM blocks to make a structure.
  • Puts confetti and water together to see what will happen.
  • Creates different colors by mixing color combinations, like blue and yellow or red and blue.
  • Uses an egg beater in water and then in sand to see what will happen.
Expresses interest in new activities or materials by watching intently or by asking questions
  • Watches an adult and peers building a road in the wet sand and might ask, “What are you doing?”
  • Asks about new toys in the water table, “What’s that? What do you do with that?” (May use a communication device.)
  • Uses new materials in ways he has seen adult use them.
Performs simple actions in the environment to experiment with how things work
  • Watches sand go through fingers.
  • Rolls things down the slide to see which one goes down faster.
  • Sees how hard she has to roll the car to make it go across the room.
Actively explores things in the environment
  • Touches objects.
  • Bangs objects.
  • Manipulates objects.
Notices new people, objects, or sounds
  • Looks, turns head, or reaches in the direction of a new adult or material.
Orients to things in the environment
  • Turns head toward sound.
  • Orients to light.
  • “Inspects” surroundings.

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Measure 21 (LRN 2 of 2) Attention Maintenance and Persistence

Definition: Child persists in attending, mastering, and understanding an activity of his/her choice in the face of difficulty or challenge

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 21 Level Descriptor Examples
Continues with long-term activities, returning to them over several days or more
  • Continues at a pottery activity that involves shaping the clay, letting it dry, painting it, and letting it dry some more.
  • For several days, attempts to pour water into a bottle at the water table until he or she is successful.
  • Tries to climb higher on the climbing structure until he or she can climb to the top.
Usually works through difficulties encountered in activities
  • Works at completing a challenging puzzle, even if having trouble fitting the right pieces.
  • Rebuilds house made out of sticks when it tumbles.
  • Persists at trying to trace hand, even though it is hard to keep fingers still.
Continues activities on own even in a distracting environment
  • Completes a puzzle even though another child has started to play with a noisy toy nearby.
  • Continues to look intently at a bug, even though other children are riding trikes around him or her.
  • Looks at book or listens to story on headphones from beginning to end.
Attends to more than one thing at the same time
  • Maintains play with play dough while saying something to another child.
  • Sings song while doing an art project.
Maintains attention for a short time
  • Stays interested in toy for a short while even though other children are playing nearby.
  • Tries to position self to look at book even if view is partially blocked.
  • Continues play with other children even through adult is setting up another activity.
Pays attention to things of interest, but may be easily distracted
  • Listens intently or “dances” when hearing a familiar song but stops upon seeing a new child.
  • Stops playing at sand table after noticing other children playing with blocks.
Responds in different ways, depending on the situation
  • Watches or listens intently to new people, objects, or events.
  • Makes eye contact, smiles, or coos in response to adult.
  • Tracks something as it moves through space.
Reacts to external events by change in state or attention
  • Attends to moving object.
  • Quiets to adult’s voice.
  • Orients to sound or light.

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Indicator: Cognitive Competence (COG) —Children show cognitive competence and problem solving skills through play and daily activities

Measure 22 (COG 1 of 4) Memory

Definition: Child stores, retrieves, and uses information about both familiar and unfamiliar events, past experiences, people, and things

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 22 Level Descriptor Examples
Communicates memories about a sequence of related events that happened in the past
  • Retells a story by telling the main events (“When Jack sold the cow and then planted the beans, the beans grew so tall.”).
  • Puts three or four pictures or parts of a story in sequence.
  • Acts out a scenario of “The Mighty Ducks” movie in dramatic play.
Communicates memories about an infrequent event that happened in the past
  • Tells about a trip to the zoo.
  • Remembers that a firefighter came and talked to class.
  • Answers a question such as, “What did we do yesterday that was different?”
Communicates one or two key details about familiar people, surroundings, things, or events that were experienced at an earlier time
  • Asks about several items that were in the water table or sandbox but might not be there now.
  • Tells adult that she had a pumpkin cookie for snack in the morning.
  • Imitates a funny thing his dog did in the morning.
Actions demonstrate memory of simple routines

Without being told:

  • Sits down for afternoon snack after free play.
  • Puts on paint smock before starting to paint.
  • Goes to cubby to get coat when adult says, “It’s time to go outside.”
Looks for objects or people in familiar places
  • Looks for favorite toy in its usual location.
  • Goes to the door to look for adult.
Shows awareness that familiar people or things still exist when they are not physically present
  • Seeks favorite toy when it rolls under the couch and out of sight.
  • Pulls adult’s hand away when caregiver is hiding face during Peek-a-Boo.
Attends to people, things, and their features
  • Alternates attention between two objects or people.
  • Takes toy out of mouth, examines it, and then continues mouthing it.
  • Inspects adult’s face by touching different parts.
  • Stops moving to listen to musical toy.
Orients to auditory, visual, or tactile stimuli
  • Quiets to sound.
  • Quiets to touch.

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Measure 23 (COG 2 of 4) Cause and Effect

Definition: Child shows understanding of the connection between cause and effect

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 23 Level Descriptor Examples
Makes a prediction on own about what will happen in a new situation (The prediction might not always be accurate, but is based on what he/she knows at the time)
  • Predicts when a tower will fall over when someone is stacking blocks.
  • Predicts what will happen to the ice cube if put in the sun.
  • Sees a dark cloud in a picture book and predicts that it will rain.
  • Says, “If you have your shoe laces untied, you will trip.”
Shows understanding of familiar cause and effect through language or action
  • Says, “I figured out how to get pink—mix red and white.”
  • Sees a balloon getting blown up and covers his ears in anticipation of a pop.
  • Says, “If I spin around, I get dizzy.”
Anticipates that a routine action will have a specific result
  • Knows to turn the handle on the water fountain to get a drink.
  • Flips the light switch on when adult says the room seems dark.
  • Walks slowly to the sandbox with a cup of water to avoid spilling.
Experiments with objects or actions in novel ways to find out what will happen
  • Puts a toy car in a tube and watches it roll out the other end when the tube is tilted.
  • Pours sand into a funnel and tries to catch it as it drains into the sandbox.
  • Spins a jar lid to see what will happen.
  • Tries to run before jumping to find out if it makes him jump farther.
Searches for possible causes of actions, events, or behaviors (physical searching not mental)
  • Tries to figure out how to open things.
  • Pushes on different parts of toy to make music turn on again.
  • Explores what made a wind-up toy move.
Tries out behaviors in own repertoire to cause things to happen
  • When playing Peek-a-Boo, pulls adult’s hand to face to continue game or action.
  • Pushes things off table and watches or listens as they fall.
  • Vocalizes to adult to engage in play.
Repeats actions that have an effect
  • Shakes rattle over and over to make sound.
  • Continues to bat or kick mobile.
  • Smiles each time adult claps.
Shows anticipatory excitement
  • Moves arms or legs when adult approaches.
  • Startles at loud noises.
  • Looks or turns when he or she hears adult’s voice from a distance.

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Measure 24 (COG 3 of 4) Engages in Problem-Solving

Definition: Child shows increasing ability to reason logically or use strategies to solve challenging problems

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 24 Level Descriptor Examples
Demonstrates or describes alternative strategies for solving problems
  • When building a bridge with unit blocks and runs out of the same size block, will look for alternative materials and continue building with them.
  • Starts building a tower with a plan in mind even if it does not work—for example, puts the tallest block first, then tries again with the biggest on the bottom.
  • When ball gets stuck in a tree, comes up with several ideas for how to get it down.
  • Looks at picture to figure out how to build something.
Uses familiar objects or actions in a new way to solve problems
  • When building a bridge, first takes one long block and puts it across two other blocks to see if the size is right before continuing to build.
  • Uses block as a doorstop when the classroom doorstop disappears.
  • When an unfamiliar toy stops working, looks to see if batteries are missing.
Solves problems without trying out every possibility, while avoiding solutions that clearly won’t work
  • Chooses large rectangular block as base of tower, instead of using a triangular block with incline.
  • Uses small broom from housekeeping area to reach something up high.
  • Knows which button to push to activate the computer or TV remote control.
Tries a strategy he or she saw someone else use to help solve a problem
  • Imitates another child building a bridge with long blocks.
  • Watches another child dig out a toy in the sandbox using a stick, instead of a shovel, and then tries that on own.
  • After watching an adult, uses a block to retrieve a wedged toy.
  • After watching a child, pushes a wagon that is too difficult to pull.
Tries to solve simple problems using trial and error
  • Turns a puzzle piece to get it to fit in a wooden puzzle.
  • Tries all holes in shape sorter with one shape until he finds the correct hole.
  • Pushes several parts of toy until she finds the part that activates the toy.
  • Tries different ways to get ball that has rolled under a sofa.
Uses simple strategies to find out about people or things to reach a goal
  • Opens, closes, or bangs on books or toys.
  • Moves around furnishings to get to toy.
  • Squeezes onto adult’s lap, even if another child is already there.
Explores by trying to make contact with people, parts of self and things
  • Tries to roll over to move toward an object.
  • Reaches for own feet.
  • Grabs and puts rattle in mouth.
  • Touches adult’s hair.
Orients to things in the environment
  • Turns head toward item that touches his or her cheek.
  • Grasps adult finger reflexively.
  • Cries at loud noise.

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Measure 25 (COG 4 of 4) Object and Pretend Play

Definition: Child uses objects to represent other objects or ideas

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 25 Level Descriptor Examples
Organizes pretend play around an elaborate idea, negotiating roles and rules with or without props
  • Pretends to be a teacher and “instructs” a few other children letting them know the “rules” for the classroom.
  • Pretends to operate a restaurant in the housekeeping center with or without other children. Takes orders, cooks, and serves food with or without props.
Organizes pretend play around a simple idea using several different items to represent other items
  • With other children pretends to be “doggies,” using plastic dishes as dog bowls and big wooden beads as dog food.
  • Makes a pretend cake with sand in sandbox and uses stick as spoon to stir the “cake batter.”
  • Makes a castle with blocks using pieces of fabric as flags.
Pretends an item represents another item or serves a different purpose
  • Uses a block to represent a cookie.
  • Pretends scarf is blanket for baby doll.
  • Uses plastic banana as a phone to call grandma.
Uses miniature objects or toys that represent real-life objects in functional ways
  • Drinks from a toy cup.
  • Feeds baby doll with toy spoon.
  • Places toy pot on stove.
  • Puts toy cell phone to ear.
Uses real objects functionally in play
  • Uses brush on hair.
  • Stirs in cup with spoon.
  • Uses crayon to mark on paper.
Combines objects in play
  • Places objects in containers.
  • Nests cups.
  • Stacks one object on another.
Explores objects in different ways
  • Mouths objects.
  • Bangs objects.
  • Shakes objects.
Regards objects briefly
  • Watches mobile.
  • Stares at objects with patterns.

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Indicator: MATH—Children demonstrate competence in real-life mathematical concepts

Measure 26 (MATH 1 of 8) Number Sense: Understands Quantity and Counting

Definition: Child uses number names to represent quantities and counts increasingly larger sets of objects

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 26 Level Descriptor Examples
Knows that written numerals represent “how many” in a group
  • Can match some written numerals (in the 1 to 9 range) to the corresponding number of objects.
  • Points to the numeral 5 on his birthday card, and says, “Five! That shows how many years old I am!”
Counts up to 10 (or more) items correctly to find out “how many” in a group or to produce a given number
  • At snack, counts out the correct number of cups when adult asks for six more.
  • Paints a picture of ten flowers and correctly indicates how many there are.
  • Says, “My brother is six,” and holds up five fingers on one hand and one on the other.
  • When playing a board game with dice, rolls “seven,” then counts seven spaces while advancing her game piece.
Counts up to 5 objects correctly and knows that the last object counted is the total number of objects
  • Counts five bears in a storybook, “1, 2, 3, 4, 5—there are five bears.”
  • Child hands five blocks to adult when asked for five blocks.
  • Points to count five puppies in a picture book, then holds up five fingers to show “how many.”
Knows numbers in the correct sequence to 10
  • Recites the numbers 1 to 10 correctly.
Uses the number words “one” through “three” to accurately describe quantity without counting
  • “I only have one cookie, I want two.”
  • “I see three dogs.”
  • Indicates she wants two crackers by touching card with two dots.
Knows and uses simple number names in situations appropriate to number or quantity, but not always correctly
  • May say two or three to indicate more than one item.
  • When asked, “How old are you?” sometimes puts up two fingers and sometimes puts up five fingers.
  • “Counts” by saying number words (e.g., “1, 2, 5, 1, 2”) while pointing randomly to objects in a group.
Recognizes that there are different amounts of things
  • Asks for “more” of something using gesture or word.
  • Puts all pop beads in basket, then dumps the basket.
Alternates attention between objects for brief periods of time
  • Focuses, plays, or interacts with one object and then another.
  • Holds something in each hand.
  • Watches moving toys on mobile, attending briefly to one toy, then another.

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Measure 27 (MATH 2 of 8) Number Sense: Math Operations

Definition: Child shows increasing ability to add and subtract small quantities of objects

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 27 Level Descriptor Examples
Solves simple addition and subtraction story problems using objects or fingers to represent problems or by mental calculation
  • Uses fingers to calculate the answer to a simple story problem: “Mary has three balloons. She gets two more balloons. How many balloons does Mary have now?”
  • Solves a simple subtraction problem using mental calculation: “I had six goats, but two of my goats ran away. How many goats do I have left?”
Communicates that adding one object or taking away one object changes the number in a group by exactly one
  • Says, “My sister is 6-years-old. Next year she’ll be 7.”
  • Adds another dinosaur to his set of nine to have exactly 10.
  • Says, “I have five grapes. If I eat one, I’ll have four left.”
Uses counting of objects to solve simple addition and subtraction problems with at least 5 objects
  • Adds two blocks to a tower of three, then counts all the blocks. Says, “Now my tower is five blocks high.”
  • Takes seven goldfish for snack. Eats three, then counts to see how many are left.
  • Brings over two more cups to a group of four and says that there are six cups.
Solves simple addition and subtraction problems (plus or minus one) with up to 2 or 3 objects
  • Says to a friend who is using three buckets, “If you give me one you’ll still have two.”
  • Adds one counting bear to a group of two bears to make three bears.
Adds one or more objects to a group to make it bigger and takes away objects to make it smaller
  • Gives two of her bristle blocks to a friend, who needs more to finish her building.
  • Brings additional measuring cups to sand table and says, “Now we have more cups!”
  • Asks or gestures for one more cracker so she’ll have more.
Takes action to obtain more or less
  • Gathers together “a lot” of LEGOTM blocks before beginning to build.
  • Drinks most of milk from cup, then hands it to adult to refill.
  • Dumps sand out of a bucket to carry less.
Manipulates objects to change the amount in a group
  • Puts one block and then another block in a toy dump truck, dumps them out, and repeats the actions.
  • Rocks a baby doll in a cradle. Puts in several more dolls and continues rocking.
Actively attends to objects or events in the environment
  • Focuses, plays, or interacts with one object.
  • Watches a hanging toy as it swings.
  • Holds a rattle in his hand and shakes it repeatedly.

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Measure 28 (MATH 3 of 8) Number Sense: Comparison of Quantity

Definition: Child compares and orders simple quantities

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 28 Level Descriptor Examples
Can compare and order numbers in the counting sequence up to 5 or more
  • When told that Billy is 6 and Julio is 5, correctly says that Billy is older.
  • When asked, “Which is less, three or four?” Says, “Three.”
Counts to compare two groups of five or more objects using words such as “more,” “same number,” and “fewer/less”
  • Counts the number of toy ducks she has and a friend has and says, “We both have five ducks so we have the same number.”
  • Counts eight boys and six girls and says, “There are more boys than girls at circle today.”
Uses one-to-one correspondence to compare the numbers of objects in two groups
  • When setting the table, recognizes that there are not as many plates as chairs at the table. (“We need more plates for the table.”)
  • Matches each of his toy trucks with those of his friend to see if they have the same number of trucks.
Communicates which of two very small groups (1 to 4 objects) is bigger when the groups differ by one
  • Says that there are more boys (three) than girls (two) in the sandbox.
  • When shown a picture with four fish and a picture with three fish, correctly indicates that the picture with four fish has more.
Communicates which of two groups is bigger when the groups are obviously different in number
  • When there is a group of 10 cups and 2 cups, points to group of 10 cups and says, “There are more cups here.”
  • When looking at a picture of farm animals with 6 cows and 2 ducks, indicates that there are more cows than ducks.
Uses one-to-one correspondence to put associated or similar objects together, but not to compare number
  • Gives each doll a teacup.
  • Helps adult put a brush in every paint container.
Recognizes that groups of objects can have different amounts
  • Puts all pop beads in basket, then dumps the basket.
  • When asked to choose a container of blocks, takes the one with more.
Alternates attention between objects for brief periods of time
  • Focuses, plays, or interacts with one object and then another.
  • Holds something in each hand.

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Measure 29 (MATH 4 of 8) Shapes

Definition: Child shows increasing knowledge of shapes and their characteristics

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 29 Level Descriptor Examples
Recognizes characteristics and differences of several shapes
  • Looking at a circle and a triangle, says, “This one had a pointy part and it’s big; this one is round, and it’s little.”
  • Can find all the circles in a group of curvilinear shapes.
  • Identifies and counts the sides of shapes to compare, for example, a triangle and a square.
  • Can describe the defining geometric features of some shapes (e.g., triangles have 3 sides).
Recognizes shapes even when they are presented in new contexts, orientations, or as part of other objects
  • Identifies triangles even through some are pointed downward.
  • Puts two triangles together to make a rectangle.
  • Makes a picture by combining shapes.
  • Turns and flips shapes to correct orientation to complete simple pattern blocks or Tangram puzzles.
6 Identifies and names several shapes in the environment (e.g. circles, squares, triangles)
  • “The clock is a circle.”
  • “My sandwich is a square.”
  • Points to a plate and indicates that it is the same shape as a circle.
Recognizes differences among shapes without naming them
  • Places shapes in a variety of form boards/simple puzzles without trying solutions that clearly won’t work.
  • Picks out several circles from a set of circles, squares, and triangles.
  • Chooses rectangular blocks of the same shape and size to build a tower.
  • Makes a picture using shapes to represent individual elements (e.g., circle for the sun, triangle for tree).
Puts objects together in ways consistent with their shapes by trying a variety of solutions
  • Given cubes or blocks of the same size and shape, stacks several (2 to 4) to make a tower.
  • Puts together and takes apart large LEGO TM blocks. May use trial and error to fit.
  • Puts rings on stacker, but not in order of size.
Not yet

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Measure 30 MATH 5 of 8 Time

Definition: Child shows understanding of the time sequence of routines and events and uses time-related vocabulary

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 30 Level Descriptor Examples
Connects some events with specific times
  • “My mom visits Grandma for lunch on Saturdays.”
  • Knows the month of his or her birthday.
  • “We don’t come to preschool on Saturday.”
  • “I have soccer practice at 4 o’clock.”
Demonstrates understanding of time sequence of events, including events that take place over extended time
  • Draws picture or puts pictures in order to show the time sequence of events in a familiar routine.
  • Relates events in a story she just heard in the correct order.
  • Talks about plants growing, seasonal changes, or life cycle (butterfly, frog).
Knows that events can be in the past or in the future
  • Refers to something that happened in the recent past, such as, “My mom just got back from a trip.”
  • Refers to an upcoming trip to see Grandma.
  • Talks about an event that happened a week ago, but says it happened yesterday.
Demonstrates understanding of before or after in familiar routines and situations
  • Says, “After circle time, we get to go outside.”
  • Uses or understands words related to order of events (before, after, and next).
Anticipates several steps of a familiar routine
  • On arriving at school, puts lunch in cubby and goes to teacher to get name tag.
  • Sees adult get sunscreen out. Goes over to adult and holds out arm for sunscreen. Runs outside after sunscreen is on.
Anticipates the next step of a familiar routine based on cues in the environment
  • Waits for parent by door to pick him or her up after nap.
  • Sees adult get sunscreen out, and goes over to door.
  • Sees adult getting ready to turn on CD/tape player, and starts to dance.
  • Tries to get in chair when she sees food.
Responds to events as they happen
  • Smiles when adult sings.
  • Attends to bottle when being fed.
Follows sleep and hunger cycles
  • Has own pattern of sleep and wake cycles.
  • Cries when hungry according to individual cycle.

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Measure 31 (MATH 6 of 8) Classification and Matching

Definition: Child shows increasing ability to compare, match, and sort objects into groups according to some common attribute

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 31 Level Descriptor Examples
Sorts a collection of objects into two or more groups using two features at the same time
  • Separates shapes into four groups—blue circles, blue squares, red circles, red squares.
  • Helps make a class chart of the number of boys with brown eyes, girls with brown eyes, boys with blue eyes, and girls with blue eyes.
Sorts a collection of objects into two or more groups based on one feature (such as size), then sorts the collection of objects again using a different feature (such as shape)
  • Separates shapes into circles and squares, regroups the shapes, then separates them into red and blue shapes.
  • Helps make a class chart of the numbers of boys and girls and another chart of the numbers of children with brown eyes and blue eyes.
  • Sorts buttons by color alone, then sorts again by shape or size or number of holes.
Sorts a collection of objects into two or more different groups based on a particular feature (such as color)
  • Puts tiles into groups by size—big, medium, and small.
  • During clean up, asks adult to put red, green, and yellow apples in different baskets.
  • Puts away pencils, crayons, and markers into different baskets.
Separates things into a group (or groups) based on a similar feature, but not always correctly
  • Separates shovels from toys in sandbox during cleanup.
  • Takes most of the yellow blocks out of the block box.
  • Separates the horses from other farm animals, then adds two cows and a pig to the group of horses.
Matches two things that are the same in some way
  • Puts two circle tiles together.
  • Puts two shoes together.
Associates one thing or person that goes with another thing or person
  • Picks up book and puts with other books.
  • Looks for baby bottle when playing with baby doll.
  • Looks at child when that child’s parent walks into room.
Relates differently to familiar (versus unfamiliar) people and things
  • Shows recognition of familiar adult’s face or voice.
  • Shows preference for own special blanket or toy from home.
Reacts to people and events
  • Looks at peoples’ faces.
  • Turns away from or toward bright light or loud sound.

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Measure 32 (MATH 7 of 8) Measurement

Definition: Child shows increasing understanding of measurable properties such as length, weight, and capacity and begins to quantify those properties

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 32 Level Descriptor Examples
Compares two objects using standard or nonstandard measures
  • Uses a piece of string to find out which bookshelf is taller.
  • Uses a scale to weigh two rocks to find out which is heavier.
  • Uses tiles to compare the length of two toy train cars.
Uses a nonstandard (or standard) unit to measure something
  • Asks adult to mark his “tall tape” on wall to see if he is taller today.
  • Tries to use hands or a stick to measure the height of a block tower.
  • Tries to use a scale to “see” how heavy a pinecone is.
  • Fills a measuring cup twice to get two cups during a cooking activity.
Orders at least three objects by size
  • Puts four dolls that are very similar in size in a line from shortest to tallest.
  • Points to pictures of three flowers in storybook from smallest to biggest.
  • Puts the three Billy Goats Gruff figures in order from largest to smallest.
Uses a strategy of directly comparing two objects to find out which is longer, heavier, or holds more
  • Determines which of two pencils is longer by standing them side-by-side.
  • Stands back to back with friend, and asks adult to see who is taller.
  • Tries to find out which block is heavier by holding one in each hand.
Understands or uses words that compare weight, length, or size of objects (e.g., taller/shorter)
  • Looks at two girls and identifies the one with longer hair.
  • Referring to his baby brother, says, “I’m bigger!”
Shows awareness that objects differ by properties such as length, weight, or capacity
  • “I’m thirsty. I want a big glass of water.”
  • Child uses a gesture to indicate how big an object is.
  • Child grunts before picking up object he thinks will be heavy.
Understands single words that refer to measurable properties such as size (big or little)
  • When asked to, finds the “big doll.” Says, “Little baby.”
  • Positions hands and/or legs far apart to “catch,” when told, “Here comes the big ball.”
Reacts to novelty in size
  • Stares at a large balloon.
  • Excitedly pats a large stuffed animal.

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Measure 33 (MATH 8 of 8) Patterning

Definition: Child shows increasing ability to recognize, reproduce, and create patterns of varying complexity

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 33 Level Descriptor Examples
Creates or extends a more complex pattern (more than two repeating elements)
  • Uses colored cubes to make red-white-blue, red-white-blue pattern.
  • Continues a clap-clap-stomp, clap-clap-stomp pattern begun by teacher.
  • Creates own version of the head, shoulders, knees, and toes pattern.
Can copy, create, and extend simple patterns using different objects
  • Creates a red-red-blue-blue, red-red-blue-blue pattern with different colored blocks on own.
  • Adds red and blue beads to a red-blue, red-blue pattern to complete a bracelet.
  • Builds a “fence” with blocks, making a big-little, big-little pattern.
  • Uses yellow and black stones to copy a pattern of green and pink cubes.
Can copy and create simple repeating patterns
  • Uses objects like blocks, beads, or toys to duplicate a model pattern of the same materials.
  • Puts toy animals in a pattern (duck, cow, duck, cow).
  • Identifies a missing element in a pattern created by someone else.
Attempts to copy or create simple repeating patterns
  • Uses objects like colored blocks to make a repeating pattern with adult’s help.
  • Begins copying a red-blue, red-blue beads pattern made by adult, then adds extra beads to the end.
Recognizes simple repeating patterns (such as ABAB)
  • Recognizes a simple repeating pattern, such as colored stripes on a friend’s shirt.
  • Participates in part of a pattern song or rhythmic game by clapping, singing, or moving.
Not yet

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Indicator: Literacy (LIT)—Children demonstrate emerging literacy skills

Measure 34 (LIT 1 of 6) Interest in Literacy

Definition: Child shows interest in books, songs, rhymes, stories, writing, and other literacy activities
and seeks information in written text

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 34 Level Descriptor Examples
Locates and requests books that relate to classroom activities and experiences
  • Goes on a nature walk to collect leaves, and on return finds a book about leaves.
  • After looking at worms under a magnifying glass, asks adult for a book on worms.
  • After stay in the hospital, requests book, “Curious George Goes to the Hospital.”
Relates content to own experience or theme
  • During a book sharing that involves discussion about pets, says that he has a black cat, too.
  • Chooses books related to a particular theme, such as dinosaurs.
Takes an active role in reading activities and routines
  • Asks/comments about specific events or characters in book (“Why is the boy sad?” or “That dog is silly.”).
  • When looking at print in the environment, asks or signs, “What’s that say?”
  • “Reads” to a friend or stuffed toy.
Shows interest in a range of literacy activities with increasing independence
  • Has one or more favorite literacy activities (i.e., books, books on tape, and magazines).
  • Initiates singing familiar songs and rhymes in play.
  • Responds to simple questions about stories or songs (“How do the wheels on the bus go?”) verbally, in sign or by speech output.
Initiates and shows interest in reading, listening to stories, imitating rhymes, and singing songs
  • Chooses to play with books during free play.
  • Asks adult to tell a story or sing a song.
  • Brings or indicates book to be read.
  • Listens to simple storybooks from beginning to end.
  • When given a choice of activities, using a switch, would sometimes indicate that he wants story time.
Participates in reading, singing, or rhyming initiated by adult
  • Sits next to adult who is reading to another child.
  • Listens to story adult tells.
  • Points to (indicates) an illustration or picture when asked questions.
Attends for short periods of time as adult reads books, sings songs, or says rhymes
  • Briefly looks at pictures when adult is reading.
  • Listens to simple songs or rhymes, and may do one basic hand motion with song.
Plays with books and responds to songs
  • Quiets, sways, or looks to source of familiar music.
  • Explores books (e.g., chews, shakes, bangs, looks at, touches, or squeezes).
Reacts to movements, patterns, gestures, and facial expressions
  • Looks at book held in child’s visual field.
  • Quiets to sound of voice reading or singing.

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Measure 35 (LIT 2 of 6) Concepts of Print

Definition: Child shows increasing understanding of the conventions and physical organization of
printed material and that print carries meaning

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 35 Level Descriptor Examples
Understands how print is used in various ways in different print materials
  • Uses many different print genres appropriately (looks at a menu and pretends to order; “reads” through a magazine; follows directions on signs).
  • Makes a card for a sick friend.
  • Follows simple recipe in an adult led cooking activity.
  • Explores Braille labels on the shelves as he travels around the room.
Understands that print is organized into units such as letters, sounds and words
  • Notes when two print units (letters, words, phrases) are the same (“There’s two M’s on this page!” or “Those words are the same.”).
  • Knows some vocabulary that describes print (e.g., “What’s this word?” or “There’s an L like in my name.”).
  • Uses words that talk about print, including how it works and what it’s used for (e.g., “I’m reading to Juan.”).
Understands the role of print in telling a story
  • Holds book appropriately, turns the pages, and pretends to read to others (may use joystick/switch to turn the pages of a book on the computer).
  • Differentiates between the role of print and the role of pictures (points to the words near a picture of the bunny and says, “That says bunny.”
  • Produces familiar words and phrases in repetitive books when reading (“Brown bear, brown bear, what do you see…?”).
Demonstrates emerging knowledge that symbols and print carry meaning
  • Recognizes name on cubby.
  • Recognizes logos of familiar brands.
  • Stops tricycle at stop sign in play yard.
  • Asks about Braille.
Understands the way books are handled and organized
  • Handles books following customary conventions (right-side up, turns pages from front to back).
  • Helps adult turn pages.
  • Participates actively with special book feature, such as pushing buttons to make noises.
  • Turns pages using popsicle stick handles on an adapted book.
Not yet

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Measure 36 (LIT 3 of 6 ) Letter and Word Knowledge

Definition: Child shows increasing awareness of symbols, letters, and words in the environment, and their relationship to sound

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 36 Level Descriptor Examples
Knows most of the letters by sight and by name, and recognizes some familiar whole written words
  • Has a beginning repertoire of sight word vocabulary, (e.g., stop, go, and names of other children).
  • Recognizes similarities between two written words (“Those both start with a B!”).
  • Given time, names most of the alphabet such as when reading an alphabet book.
  • Recognizes that words are separated by spaces.
Knows 10 or more letters by sight and by name, and understands that letters make up words and have corresponding sounds
  • Identifies many upper and/or lower-case letters (e.g., on the title page of a book or while looking at a cereal box).
  • Shows some awareness of the relationship between letter and words (“M is in my name, Mario”).
  • Shows some awareness of the relationship between letters and sounds (“T goes /t/”).
Knows some letters by sight and by name, or recognizes own name in print
  • Correctly names some letters in storybooks, artwork or logos, or other presentations (alphabet poster).
  • Finds the letter L on an alphabet puzzle.
  • Differentiates own written name from other names.
Recognizes simple symbols (numbers, letters, logos) in the environment
  • Identifies one letter from an array of letters or numbers in the environment (although may not be correct).
  • Recognizes that print on signs gives information (e.g., that a stop sign means stop).
  • Finds letter or letters that are in own name.
  • Uses voice output box to say “stop” when near a stop sign.
Shows understanding that a series of pictures represents a story
  • “Reads” story to self by following pictures in books.
  • Gestures or verbalizes when an adult has skipped a page in a familiar story.
Shows understanding that pictures represent people and things
  • Sees photo of family member and kisses it.
  • See glasses of juice in book and pretends to drink.
  • Looks for birds outside when adult shows bird pictures.
  • Points to a picture of a dog in a book and says or signs “dog.”
Shows understanding that concrete objects can represent real things
  • Sees a toy car and says, “Bye, bye.”
  • Pretends to drink from a toy cup.
Attends to things that adult points to, shows, or talks about
  • Looks at or touches things or people named by adult.
  • Looks outside when adult points outside.
Reacts to movements, patterns, gestures, and facial expressions
  • Follows a slow-moving object with eyes.
  • Follows a slow-moving object paired with a sound (e.g., rattle).
  • Reaches for a spot that is part of a design.

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Measure 37 LIT 4 of 6 Phonological Awareness

Definition: Child shows awareness of sounds that make up language, including the segmentation of sounds in words, and recognition of word rhyming and alliteration

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 37 Level Descriptor Examples
Segments parts of words
  • Segments syllables from words (removes “ball” from “baseball” to get “base”).
  • Segments sounds off of words (removes the /c/ from “cat” to get “at”).
Blends part of words
  • Blends two or more syllables into multi-syllable words (e.g., pic-nic or hot-dog).
  • Blends sounds together to form words (m + at or m + a + t to make “mat”).
Identifies sounds at the beginning of words
  • “Cat and car sound alike in the beginning.”
  • When asked, “Whose name starts with the /t/ sound?” Tonya raises her hand.
  • Participates in songs and games that involve matching words with initial sounds.
Identifies words that rhyme
  • Identifies words that rhyme with “cat.”
  • Can identify pairs of words that rhyme and pairs of words that don’t rhyme.
Shows awareness of words and syllables as units of sound
  • Claps along or pats knees to break “elephant” into e-le-phant or “pancake” into pan-cake.
  • Claps out each word in “I am Matt” in a name game.
  • After hearing the “B” book by Dr. Seuss, uses the words, “big,” “blue,” and “bull” in play.
Engages in play with sounds in words and songs
  • Claps, stomps, or sings to nursery rhymes.
  • Repeats the order of two or three sounds in the environment (repeats a pattern of two claps followed by one stomp).
  • Repeats words playfully, “Banana fana,” or “Funny Bunny.”
Imitates novel sounds
  • Child says, “ba-ba-ba.” Adult says, “da-da-da.” Child says, “da-da-da.”
Produces repetitive sounds
  • Babbles.
  • Produces consonant-vowel sounds.
Reacts to sounds in the environment
  • Cries when hears loud noise.
  • Responds differently to different sounds, i.e., settles down when he hears a familiar sound.

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Measure 38 LIT 5 of 6 Emerging Writing

Definition: Child shows increasing ability to write using scribbles, symbols, letters, and words to represent meaning

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 38 Level Descriptor Examples
Writes own name and simple words (mostly using correct letters)
  • Writes own name with letters formed almost correctly, although some or all may be a mirror image (may use letter stamps).
  • Writes some simple words spelled correctly on own or by copying, for example, cat, stop, mom, I, and go (may use computer to write).
Begins to make a few recognizable letters and knows that what is written can be read by others
  • Makes a grocery list using mock and real letters, for example, an up-side-down T, M, O, and an attempted letter.
  • Writes name with some letters formed correctly.
  • Writes label on picture.
  • Asks teacher to make a model of a word or letter so he can copy it.
Makes letter-like symbols as pretend writing to represent ideas, and attributes meaning to writing
  • “Writes” own name on a drawing using scribbles, random symbols, or letter-like marks.
  • Makes a card and tells adult what to write on it.
  • Attributes meaning to what one writes (points to a scribble and says, “This says ‘Mommy.’”).
  • Makes list and says, “I’m going shopping for milk and bread and cookies.”
Uses scribble-writing or pictures to represent people, things, or events
  • Produces different marks to represent different objects or events (circles, scribbles).
  • Scribble writes next to a picture.
  • Plays with traditional or adaptive keyboard to scribble.
Copies marks
  • Attempts to recreate a mark, or make a line look a certain way.
  • Imitates O, |, or —.
Not yet

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Measure 39 (LIT 6 of 6) Comprehension of Text

Definition: Child identifies details or story sequence in age appropriate text

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 39 Level Descriptor Examples
Compares or predicts story events in familiar stories
  • In a familiar story, makes predictions about what will come next. Says, “That caterpillar is going to eat more food.”
  • When seeing a familiar character in a book, says, “Curious George is going to get in trouble.”
Relates sequence of events of a story
  • Places story picture cards or flannel graph pictures in order as retelling story. Explains the steps of planting a seed after reading “The Carrot Seed.”
  • With proper positioning and materials, draws pictures to relate events of a story.
Relates situations or events from a story to own experience
  • Communicates, “I have a dog too.”
  • Communicates, “My mommy goes to work too.”
Asks questions or comments about stories as familiar books are read
  • Comments, “Curious George is jumping.”
  • Points to a picture and says/signs/uses voice output device to ask, “What’s that?”
Responds to simple questions related to a story that is being read
  • While reading a story, child responds to “Where’s Spot?”
  • Answers simple questions, such as “What did Brown Bear see?”
  • Responds to “What did Polar Bear hear?”
Not yet

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Desired Result 3: Children show physical and motor competence

Indicator: Motor Skills (MOT) —Children demonstrate an increased proficiency in motor skills

Measure 40 (MOT 1 of 4) Movement

Definition: Child refines the ability to move in a coordinated way using large muscles (e.g., arms and legs)

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 40 Level Descriptor Examples
Participates in extended or integrated physical activities
  • Creates own dance steps to music.
  • Participates in active play sequences that combine running, jumping, throwing, catching, kicking, etc.
  • Throws a FrisbeeTM.
Uses complex movement skills in active play
  • Gallops.
  • Hops.
  • Pumps swing using legs.
  • Skips.
  • Bounces a ball.
Uses movement skills to negotiate obstacles
  • Climbs stairs with alternating feet without holding rail.
  • Moves under, over, and through obstacles.
  • Climbs vertical ladders on playground.
  • Pedals tricycle or steers a wheelchair.
Coordinates complex movements
  • Runs.
  • Jumps forward.
  • Walks up steps with alternating feet using rail.
  • Throws and catches large ball.
Moves in an upright position without support (vertical movement)
  • Walks forward.
  • Steps sideways without holding on.
  • Steps backward.
  • Walks up to a large ball in order to “kick” it.
  • Uses a walker without help.
Moves in an upright position using support (vertical movement)
  • Holds on to table and sidesteps around it.
  • Takes step forward and sideways while holding on to furniture.
  • Uses table to pull body into standing position.
  • Uses a walker with help.
Moves whole body using arms and legs (horizontal movement)
  • Crawls to other side of room.
  • Creeps toward adult.
  • Scoots or rolls in direction of toys.
  • Gets up on all fours.
  • Uses a scooter board independently.
Makes simple movements with parts of body
  • Turns head and reaches for toy.
  • Waves arms and kicks legs at the same time.
  • Rolls from back to stomach and stomach to back.
Reflexes dominate movement
  • When head is turned to one side, arm on the same side extends.
  • Leg kicking is jerky.

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Measure 41 (MOT 2 of 4) Balance

Definition: Child refines the ability to balance self in space

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 41 Level Descriptor Examples
Coordinates multiple movements involving balancing
  • Runs and kicks a ball.
  • Holds Ping-Pong ball on spoon while walking.
  • Walks on a low wall or low balance beam.
  • Balances a bean bag on his or her head.
  • Hops on one foot for five or more hops.
Balances while in motion
  • Hops on one foot for a few hops.
  • Runs and jumps over small objects.
  • Jumps down from 2-foot stair or box.
Balances well while performing difficult motions
  • Balances on one foot without support for a few seconds.
  • Walks on line without stepping off the line.
Balances body while carrying or manipulating an object or to play with ball
  • Briefly stands on one foot while putting other foot through leg of pants.
  • Carries a large stuffed bear across a room.
  • Kicks a ball.
  • Uses arms while standing to try to catch a large ball that is thrown to him or her.
Balances whole body and supports own weight while standing on two feet
  • Stands freely.
  • Bends over and picks something up off the floor.
  • Squats down from a standing position to pick up toy and then stands again.
Balances whole body while standing on two feet using support or on all fours
  • Gets to all fours from sitting position.
  • Balances body while adult holds hand.
  • Holds on to table for balance while walking around it.
  • Uses walker for balance.
Balances support or weight of torso (head, chest, arms) while sitting
  • Sits without support.
  • Extends arms to sides to prevent falling while sitting.
Balances body briefly
  • Holds head up while being held or sitting in a car seat.
  • Lifts head and chest when on stomach.
  • Sits with support.
Depends on other people or objects to balance body
  • Lies on back as positioned by adult.
  • Remains in one position unless repositioned.
  • Depends on adult to support head.

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Measure 42 (MOT 3 of 4) Grasp/Release and Manipulation

Definition: Child uses hands to grasp, release, and manipulate objects

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 42 Level Descriptor Examples
Shows increasing refinement and detail in fine motor movements requiring strength or control of fingers
  • Places paper clips on paper.
  • Holds deck of card and sorts them.
  • Uses fork and knife to cut.
  • Cuts out picture following general shape.
Manipulates small objects requiring precise eye-hand coordination
  • Holds writing tool with correct position (thumb and two fingers).
  • Laces two holes in shoes.
  • Buttons small buttons.
Manipulates objects with each hand doing something different, to smoothly accomplish simple tasks
  • Unbuttons large buttons.
  • Spreads with knife.
  • Strings beads.
  • Peels stickers from paper backing.
Manipulates objects with both hands together to accomplish a task or do an activity
  • Puts pop-beads together.
  • Stirs with both hands on spoon.
  • Shovels with both hands on shovel.
  • Rolls a snake or makes a ball with play dough.
Manipulates objects using one hand while stabilizing the object with the other hand
  • Uses a turning motion with hand and wrist while trying to open twist tops.
  • Pulls up a zipper that is started by an adult.
  • Feeds self using spoon while holding bowl with other hand.
Picks up or holds things with fingertip(s) and thumb
  • Holds spoon using thumb and fingers to feed doll.
  • Picks up small object using thumb and more than one finger.
  • Puts things into small openings.
  • Pulls VelcroTM to undo shoes.
  • Uses index finger and thumb to pick up a piece of food.
Uses full hand grasp with thumb closed on fist
  • Adjusts grasp to size and shape of toy or food.
  • Holds crayon with full fist.
  • Releases one object to take another.
Uses arms and hands to interact with things in the environment
  • Reaches out and grasps objects near body.
  • Curls fingers and pulls objects closer in a “raking” motion.
  • Keeps hands open most of the time.
  • Manipulates objects with hands and fingers.
Grasp reflex
  • Curls fingers around adult’s finger when placed in palm.
  • Holds hands in fisted position.

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Measure 43 (MOT 4 of 4) Eye-Hand Coordination

Definition: Child uses eyes and hands together to perform or accomplish a task

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 43 Level Descriptor Examples
Integrates visual and fine motor skills to complete complex tasks
  • Uses keyboard and mouse with accuracy.
  • Attempts to copy a square (may be lopsided with rounded corners).
  • Uses an eyedropper filled with food coloring to stain an ice cube.
Integrates visual and fine motor skills to replicate a model (i.e. structure or pattern)
  • Strings small beads following a simple pattern.
  • Connects LEGOTM-type blocks to construct simple structures.
Integrates visual and fine motor skills to complete simple tasks involving use of tools
  • Copies simple drawing such as horizontal lines, vertical lines, or circles.
  • Experiments with use of scissors.
  • Moves computer mouse.
  • Uses hammer to pound nails into soft wood.
Watches and coordinates the movements of both hands together to accomplish a task or do an activity
  • Holds two cups while pouring water from one to the other.
  • Holds butterfly net with two hands while trying to catch a butterfly.
Watches and manipulates an object with one hand while stabilizing the object with the other hand
  • Uses crayon to make up-and-down or side-to-side strokes while holding paper with the other hand.
  • Turn pages in a book while holding the book with the other hand.
  • Adds an object to a stack of objects, while stabilizing the existing stack of objects with the other hand.
Watches and guides the movement of one arm and hand to accomplish a task
  • Puts objects into container.
  • Puts one object on top of another (block).
  • Places objects in defined space (e.g., large pegs in pegboard).
Watches while moving arm and hand toward object or person
  • Attempts to grasp things that are moving.
  • Bangs two toys together.
  • Transfers something from one hand to the other.
  • Pokes with finger.
Watches objects
  • Tracks objects when held in sitting position or when lying on back.
  • Looks at hands.
  • Plays with hands at midline.
  • Reaches toward objects.
Regards objects
  • Looks at mobile.
  • Briefly follows object by looking and moving head when lying on back as object is moved from side to midline.

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Desired Results 4: Children are safe and healthy

Indicator: SH—Children show an emerging awareness and practice of safe and healthy behavior

Measure 44 (SH 1 of 5) Personal Care Routines: Toileting and Hygiene

Definition: Child responds to and initiates toileting and hygiene routines that support healthy growth and help prevent the spread of infection

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 44 Level Descriptor Examples
Communicates understanding of personal care routines to others
  • Reminds others to wash their hands after eating.
  • Communicates rationale for some personal care routines (e.g., covering mouth while coughing).
Completes personal care routines independently
  • Washes hands on own (may use adaptive equipment) before eating or after toileting.
  • Uses tissue when needed without being reminded.
Completes personal care routines with help
  • Washes hands but needs adult to turn off faucet completely.
  • Brushes teeth with assistance for stability.
  • Toilets with minimal adult assistance.
Participates in simple care routines
  • Turns on water to wash hands.
  • Wipes nose when adult provides tissue.
  • Indicates need to go potty on time.
Anticipates simple caregiving routines
  • Lifts legs when adult is changing diaper.
  • Holds hands under faucet for adult to wash.
Reacts to personal care
  • Turns head away when adult wipes nose.
  • Kicks legs during diaper change; reaches toward adult.
  • Quiets during diaper change.

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Measure 45 (SH 2 of 5) Children are safe and healthy

Definition: Child refines ability to dress him or herself independently

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 45 Level Descriptor Examples
Dresses independently and manipulates most fasteners independently
  • Buttons up pants.
  • Puts on shoes correctly.
Puts on clothing independently
  • Puts on shirt, sweater, pants or jacket (may need extra time or stable position).
  • Knows front and back of clothing.
  • Fastens by zipper or VelcroTM (may need to use a zipper with large zipper pull).
Removes clothing independently
  • Removes shirt.
  • Removes dress or sweater.
With adult assistance, removes and puts on simple, loose clothing
  • Pulls pants down with assistance.
  • Pulls pants up with assistance.
  • Removes coat with assistance.
Assists with dressing
  • Pulls off sock.
  • Puts arms through sleeve.
  • Removes hat.
  • Puts on shoes with assistance.
Cooperates in dressing
  • Allows adult to dress him or her.
  • Looks up to adult who is dressing her.
  • Extends arms while being dressed.

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Measure 46 (SH 3 of 5) Personal Care Routines: Self-Feeding

Definition: Child refines ability to feed him or herself independently

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 46 Level Descriptor Examples
Prepares very simple snacks
  • Fixes a sandwich.
  • Prepares a bowl of cereal and milk (may need extra time).
  • Cuts and spreads with a knife.
Serves food or drink to self
  • Pours from a container.
  • Serves self from a bowl.
  • Spreads with a knife.
Feeds self whole meal
  • Uses utensils to feed self whole meal (may use adaptive bowl).
  • Eats meal independently with adaptive seating.
  • Holds and drinks from a cup with some spilling.
  • Feeds self with spoon (may be an adaptive spoon) with some spilling.
Feeds self with assistance
  • Uses fingers to eat small pieces of food.
  • Drinks from cup with assistance.
  • Holds spoon with assistance.
Accepts food from a spoon
  • Swallows strained or pureed food.
Coordinates sucking and breathing
  • Sucks from a nipple or bottle.

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Measure 47 (SH 4 of 5) Personal Safety

Definition: Child shows awareness of safety practices that minimize risk and support healthy growth

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 47 Level Descriptor Examples
Communicates understanding of safety rules to others
  • Reminds others to walk inside the classroom.
  • Redirects self or others to follow safety rules (e.g., turns trike around if traveling in wrong direction).
  • Communicates rationale for simple rules (e.g., not running into the street).
Applies known safety rules in a variety of situations
  • Picks up toys/materials when dropped on floor.
  • Uses climbing/outdoor play equipment safely (e.g., jumps down from safe heights).
  • Uses equipment/devices (e.g., cane) appropriately.
Usually follows simple safety rules on own
  • Rides trike on trail and wears a helmet.
  • Leaves scissors at the table.
Follows simple safety rules when reminded
  • When reminded, takes adult’s hand while crossing street.
  • Waits for adult assistance during transition to different position (e.g., moving from walker to chair).
  • Follows adult direction in using toys/materials safely (e.g., building a block tower within safe limits).
Seeks out adult when feeling insecure or unsafe
  • Moves or signals to adult when frightened or unsure.
  • Holds out hand for adult when walking down a step or ramp.
  • Uses adult to assist in transitioning from different positions.
Responds in situations that make him or her feel unsafe
  • Looks, reaches, or orients toward adult when frightened or unsure.
  • When being carried, clings to adult when feeling adult’s grip loosen.
  • Allows adult to place and strap in stroller, car seat, or high chair.

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Measure 48 (SH 5 of 5) Understanding Healthy Lifestyle: Eating and Nutrition

Definition: Child shows awareness of eating habits that support healthy growth

Mark the highest developmental level the child has mastered.

Measure 48 Level Descriptor Examples
Begins to make healthy food choices with occasional reminders from adult
  • Can identify healthy foods but may or may not eat them.
  • Serves self a single serving of food.
  • Communicates understanding of the role food plays in health: “Carrots are good for me.” or “Milk makes me strong.”
Follows guidance given by adult about healthy eating choices
  • Finishes milk.
  • Eats sandwich before cookie.
  • Follows adult reminder not to eat too fast or too slowly.
Eats a variety of foods
  • Selects a variety of food from foods offered by adult.
  • Accepts food of different textures (e.g., crunchy, soft, thin/thick liquids).
Explores new food and food textures
  • Tries new foods.
  • Plays with food as a means of exploring (e.g., smears, pats, or sucks on fingers).
Accepts food
  • Reaches or moves toward food (e.g., bowl).
  • Smacks lips, looks to adult for more food.
Communicates hunger
  • Fusses or communicates when hungry.
  • Expresses pleasure or comfort during feeding.


Top | Table of Contents | Introduction | Tools for Completing the DRDP access | Completing the Information Page | Rating the Measures | Finalizing the Assessment | Information Page | Rating Record | Measures


DRDP access Manual © 2007 by the California Department of Education, Special Education Division

The Desired Results Developmental Profile access (DRDP access) Manual was developed by the Desired Results access Project.

The Desired Results access Project is funded by the California Department of Education (CDE), Special Education Division (Contract #6217) to assist the CDE with developing and putting in place a system to assess the progress of California’s preschool children with disabilities.

 

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Last updated: 07/28/2014